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By ESPN Staff

Brazilians power CSKA Moscow to Cup final victory

MOSCOW, May 20 (Reuters) - CSKA Moscow kept hold of the Russian Cup on Saturday after their Brazilian strikers Jo and Vagner Love swept them to a 3-0 victory over city rivals Spartak.

Jo opened the scoring two minutes before the end of a fast and furious first half, driving a free kick through the wall and out of reach of Spartak keeper Wojciech Kowalewski.

Spartak, who have not won a game against CSKA since 2001, tried hard to level but never looked dangerous and their misery was compounded when midfielder Santos Mozart was shown a red card for fouling fellow Brazilian Dudu two minutes from time.

Vagner Love made it 2-0 with a solo effort in the 90th minute when he picked the ball up in midfield and foxed the goalkeeper.

Jo, Russian league's top scorer with 11 goals in nine matches, then finished off Spartak with a clean strike from just outside the box in injury time.

Spartak's caretaker coach Vladimir Fedotov praised his opponents.

'We simply lost to a better team,' said former CSKA striker Fedotov.

CSKA coach Valery Gazzayev added: 'It's not enough to play well, it was also important to show the team spirit and fight to the end.'

In 2005 CSKA beat first division Khimki 1-0 in the Cup final less than two weeks after lifting the UEFA Cup, the first Russian club to win a major European trophy.

Saturday's victory was CSKA's eighth cup triumph, putting them ahead of city rivals Dynamo and Torpedo, both on seven. Spartak have won a record 13 finals since the competition began in the Soviet Union in 1936.