Featured Matches
Previous
AS Roma
Manchester United
8:10 PM GMT
Game Details
New York Red Bulls
Arsenal
9:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Internazionale
Real Madrid
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Chicago
Tottenham Hotspur
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Houston
Aston Villa
1:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Toronto FC
Kansas City
11:00 PM GMT
Game Details
New England
Columbus
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
RB Leipzig
Queens Park Rangers
12:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Newport County
FC Carl Zeiss Jena
1:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Accrington Stanley
Burnley
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Barnsley
Hull City
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Bath
Cheltenham Town
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Bradford City
Blackburn Rovers
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Chesham United
Stevenage
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Chesterfield
Leeds United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Crewe Alexandra
Wolverhampton Wanderers
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Dagenham & Redbridge
Colchester United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Ebbsfleet United
Portsmouth
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Gillingham
Ipswich Town
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Hyde
Altrincham
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Kidderminster Harriers
Birmingham City
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Luton Town
Antwerp
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Northampton Town
Leyton Orient
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Peterborough United
Brighton & Hove Albion
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Rochdale
Middlesbrough
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Scunthorpe United
Huddersfield Town
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Tamworth
Rotherham United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Whitby
Hartlepool United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Woking
AFC Wimbledon
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Workington
Carlisle United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Wycombe Wanderers
Reading
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Brentford
Nice
3:00 PM GMT
Game Details
TSV 1860 Munich
Stoke City
3:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Braintree Town
Cambridge United
6:45 PM GMT
Game Details
AS Roma
Manchester United
8:10 PM GMT
Game Details
New York Red Bulls
Arsenal
9:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Internazionale
Real Madrid
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Chicago
Tottenham Hotspur
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Houston
Aston Villa
1:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Arbroath
Alloa Athletic
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Brora
Stenhousemuir
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Cowdenbeath
Brechin City
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Dunfermline Athletic
Raith Rovers
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
East Fife
Forfar Athletic
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
East Stirlingshire
Falkirk
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Elgin City
Stirling Albion
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Montrose
Peterhead
2:00 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Airdrie United
Albion Rovers
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Clyde
Ayr United
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Greenock Morton
Spartans
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Heart of Midlothian
Annan Athletic
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Queen of the South
Livingston
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Stranraer
Dumbarton
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Waasland-Beveren
Club Brugge
4:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Cercle Brugge KSV
KAA Gent
6:00 PM GMT
Game Details
KVC Westerlo
KSC Lokeren
6:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Lierse SK
KV Oostende
6:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Wolfsberger AC
Austria Vienna
2:30 PM GMT
Game Details
FC Magna Wr. Neustadt
SV Salzburg
5:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Rapid Vienna
SV Josko Ried
5:00 PM GMT
Game Details
SC Rheindorf Altach
FC Trenkwalder Admira
5:00 PM GMT
Game Details
AaB
FC Midtjylland
3:00 PM GMT
Game Details
FC Copenhagen
FC Nordsjaelland
5:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Malmo FF
Kalmar FF
2:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Halmstad
Gefle IF
4:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Aalesund
Lillestrom
1:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Sandnes Ulf
Stromsgodset
4:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Grasshoppers
FC Thun
3:45 PM GMT
Game Details
FC Sion Sitten
St Gallen
6:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Athlone Town FC
St Patricks
6:45 PM GMT
Game Details
Toronto FC
Kansas City
11:00 PM GMT
Game Details
New England
Columbus
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
America
Tijuana
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Puebla
Veracruz
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
U.A.N.L
León
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Pachuca
Monterrey
1:06 AM GMT
Game Details
Chiapas
Toluca
2:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Atlanta Silverbacks
Minnesota United FC
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Carolina RailHawks
Ottawa Fury FC
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Fort Lauderdale Strikers
New York Cosmos
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Tampa Bay Rowdies
San Antonio Scorpions
11:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Rosario Central
Juventud Unida Universitario
8:15 PM GMT
Game Details
Boca Juniors
Huracán
11:15 PM GMT
Game Details
Mérida
Oaxaca
11:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Zacatepec
Correcaminos
11:00 PM GMT
Game Details
At. San Luis
Dorados de Sinaloa
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Irapuato
Coras Tepic
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Celaya
Lobos BUAP
1:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Criciúma
EC Vitória
9:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Cruzeiro
Figueirense FC
9:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Santos FC
Chapecoense AF
9:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Bahia
Internacional
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
AA Ponte Preta
CR Vasco da Gama
7:20 PM GMT
Game Details
Goianiense
Náutico
7:20 PM GMT
Game Details
Joinville
Avaí
7:20 PM GMT
Game Details
Santa Cruz FC
Ceará
7:20 PM GMT
Game Details
Paraná Clube
ABC
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Sampaio Correa-MA
Vila Nova-GO
12:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Universidad de Concepción
Huachipato
4:30 PM GMT
Game Details
O'Higgins
Universidad de Chile
7:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Barnechea
Unión La Calera
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Unión Española
Universidad Católica
12:30 AM GMT
Game Details
Atlético Huila
Itagüí
8:15 PM GMT
Game Details
Envigado
Deportes Tolima
8:15 PM GMT
Game Details
La Equidad
Millonarios
10:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Uniautonoma
Atlético Junior
10:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Deportivo Pasto
Independiente Medellín
12:45 AM GMT
Game Details
AS Roma
Manchester United
8:06 PM GMT
Game Details
Internazionale
Real Madrid
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
León de Huánuco
Cienciano del Cusco
5:00 PM GMT
Game Details
San Martin
UTC
8:00 PM GMT
Game Details
César Vallejo
Sporting Cristal
10:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Juan Aurich
Unión Comercio
1:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Sol de América
Libertad
7:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Sportivo Luqueño
Rubio Ñú
9:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Comunicaciones
Coatepeque
10:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Marquense
Suchitepequez
2:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Xelaju
Penarol
2:00 AM GMT
Game Details
Chicago Red Stars
Houston Dash
6:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Next
Jun 19, 2013

Protesters block stadium access

SAO PAULO -- Scattered street demonstrations popped up around Brazil early Wednesday as protesters continued their collective cry against the low-quality public services they receive in exchange for high taxes and high prices.

In one of several reported protests, about 200 people blocked the Anchieta Highway that links Sao Paulo and the port city of Santos. They left after two hours and headed to the industrial suburb of Sao Bernardo do Campo, an industrial suburb on Sao Paulo's outskirts.

In the northeastern city of Fortaleza, protesters blocked the main access road to the stadium where Brazil will pay Mexico in the Confererations Cup on Wednesday.

Police diverted traffic away from the road as hundreds of demonstrators gathered near the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza. Official FIFA vehicles were among those struggling to get to the venue for the group stage match.

On Tuesday night, tens of thousands of Brazilians flooded the streets of the country's biggest to express their longstanding lament about being weighed down by high costs and a system of government infected with corruption.

That was the repeated message in Sao Paulo, where upward of 50,000 people massed in front of the city's main cathedral late Tuesday. While mostly peaceful, the demonstration followed the rhythm of protests that drew 240,000 people across Brazil the previous night, with small bands of radicals splitting off to fight with police and break into stores.

Fernando Grella Vieira, head of the Sao Paulo state public safety department, said 63 people were detained during Tuesday's protests. He told the Globo TV network on Wednesday that police would guarantee the right to demonstrate but would "repress all forms of vandalism."

Mass protests have been mushrooming across Brazil since demonstrations called last week by a group angry over the high cost of a woeful public transport system and a recent 10-cent hike in bus and subway fares in Sao Paulo, Rio and elsewhere.

The local governments in at least four cities have now agreed to reverse those hikes, and city and federal politicians have shown signs that the Sao Paulo fare could also be rolled back. It's not clear that will calm the country, though, because the protests have released a seething litany of discontent from Brazilians over life's struggles.

Yet, beyond complaints about the cost for bus and subway rides, protesters haven't produced a laundry list of concrete demands. Demonstrators mainly are expressing deep anger and discontentment -- not just with the ruling government, but with the entire governing system. A common chant at the rallies has been "No parties!"

"What I hope comes from these protests is that the governing class comes to understand that we're the ones in charge, not them, and the politicians must learn to respect us," said Yasmine Gomes, a 22-year-old squeezed into the plaza in central Sao Paulo where Tuesday night's protest began.

President Dilma Rousseff, a former leftist guerrilla who was imprisoned and tortured during Brazil's 1964-85 dictatorship, hailed the protests for raising questions and strengthening Brazil's democracy. "Brazil today woke up stronger," she said in a statement.

Yet Rousseff offered no actions that her government might take to address complaints, even though her administration is a prime target of demonstrators' frustrations.

The protests have brought troubling questions about security in the country, which is playing host this week to soccer's Confederations Cup and will welcome Pope Francis in July for a visit to Rio de Janeiro and rural Sao Paulo.

Brazil's media has scrambled to cover the sprawling protests -- coverage that in some cases raised the ire of protesters, in particular that of the powerful Globo TV network. Whenever what appears to be a Globo helicopter swoops over a demonstration, protesters hiss, raise their fists and chant slogans against the network for what they say was its failure to widely show images of a violent police crackdown on protesters last week in Sao Paulo.

Brazilian demonstrations in recent years generally had tended to attract small numbers of politicized participants, but the latest mobilizations have united huge crowds around a central complaint: The government provides woeful public services even as the economy is modernizing and growing.

The Brazilian Tax Planning Institute think tank found that the country's tax burden in 2011 stood at 36 percent of gross domestic product, ranking it 12th among the 30 countries with the world's highest tax burdens.

Yet public services such as schools are in sorry shape. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development found in a 2009 educational survey that literacy and math skills of Brazilian 15-year-olds ranked 53rd out of 65 countries, behind nations such as Bulgaria, Mexico, Turkey, Trinidad and Tobago, and Romania.

Many protesting in Brazil's streets hail from the country's growing middle class, which government figures show has ballooned by some 40 million over the past decade amid a commodities-driven economic boom.

They say they've lost patience with endemic problems such as government corruption and inefficiency. They're also slamming Brazil's government for spending billions of dollars to host next year's World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Olympics while leaving other needs unmet.

A November report from the government raised to $13.3 billion the projected cost of stadiums, airport renovations and other projects for the World Cup. City, state and other local governments are spending more than $12 billion on projects for the Olympics in Rio. Nearly $500 million was spent to renovate Maracana stadium in Rio for the World Cup even though the venue already went through a significant face-lift before the 2007 Pan American Games.

Attorney Agatha Rossi de Paula, who attended the latest protest in Sao Paulo along with her mother, called Brazil's fiscal priorities "an embarrassment."

"We just want what we paid in taxes back, through health care, education and transportation," said the 34-year-old attorney. "We want the police to protect us, to help the people on the streets who have ended up with no job and no money."

Although a single group set the protests in motion with its demonstrations last week calling for lowered transit fares, the mass gatherings are showing no evidence of any central leadership, with people using social media to call for marches and rallies. Groups of Brazilians also staged small protests Tuesday in other countries, including Mexico, Portugal, Spain and Denmark.

A cyber-attack knocked the government's official World Cup site offline Tuesday, and the Twitter feed for Brazil's Anonymous hackers group posted links to a host of other government websites whose content had been replaced by a screen calling on citizens to come out to the streets.

Tuesday night's march in Sao Paulo started out peacefully but turned nasty outside City Hall when a small group lashed out at police and tried to invade the building.

Different groups of protesters faced off, one chanting "peace, peace" while trying to form a human cordon to protect the building, the other trying to clamber up metal poles to get inside. At one point, one person tried to seize a metal barrier from another who was trying to use it to smash the building's windows and doors.

The air was thick with police pepper spray and smoke after demonstrators set a TV satellite truck and a police lookout booth on fire.

FIFA President Sepp Blatter urged protesters flooding the streets of Brazil to stop linking their anger against the government to the Confederations Cup.

 

The biggest demonstrations since the end of the country's 1964-85 military dictatorship have been swelling since Saturday's start of the Confederations Cup, which serves as a test event for the World Cup.

"They are linking them (the protests) to the Confederations Cup," Blatter said in an interview with Brazil's Globo TV network. "I can understand that people are not happy, but they should not use football to make their demands heard."

The government is projecting that $13.3 billion will be spent on stadiums, airport renovations and other projects for the World Cup, with an estimated $3.5 billion on venues.

Banners at the demonstrations in Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro have highlighted such spending compared with an apparent lack of improvement to Brazil's notoriously poor infrastructure.

"Brazil asked to host the World Cup," Blatter said. "We did not impose the word upon Brazil. They knew that to host a good World Cup they would naturally have to build stadiums.

"But we said that it was not just for the World Cup. Together with the stadiums there are other constructions: highways, hotels, airports ... items that for the future. Not just for the World Cup."

Blatter heard the extent of the public's rage before the Confederations Cup opener between Brazil and Japan on Saturday when he and Rousseff were loudly jeered when their names were introduced at the National Stadium in Brasilia.

"They could jeer FIFA's president -- I don't care, because people could like or dislike the FIFA president," Blatter said.

"But the chief-of-state was there and I asked for a little bit of respect and a clean game. For her not me."

 

 

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.