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Clubs demand more World Cup cash

The European Club Association president Karl-Heinz Rummenigge has opened talks with Sepp Blatter after calling for more of FIFA's World Cup money to go to clubs.

A total of 575 clubs are receiving payments from UEFA for releasing their players for Euro 2012, with Real Madrid, Barcelona, Manchester City and Juventus all due to receive more than €2 million.

The compensation, totalling €100 million, has been allocated in accordance with the renewed Memorandum of Understanding signed by the European Club Association and UEFA in March.

Now Bayern Munich chief executive Rummenigge has told Blatter that clubs around the world will expect a substantial increase on the $70 million revenues from the last world cup when the next one takes place in Brazil in 2014.

He said he and Blatter had already had an "intensive and interesting discussion" about the issue at FIFA's headquarters in Zurich, adding: "We have very good and fair relations with UEFA, and I hope that will be possible with FIFA as well. "After that meeting I am quite optimistic that we can find a solution."

Now the European clubs have flexed their muscles on finance, they will also be seeking an input into decisions from FIFA and UEFA and have already made their mark with demands over the restricted internal calendar.

"Sepp Blatter told me that he recognizes the clubs as the roots of football," Rummenigge said. "You know the roots always need water, and the water has to come from FIFA."

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