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Rewind to Boxing Day 1963

Barclays Premier League
Read

AL medal goes to wrong player

In an embrassing gaffe, Perth Glory captain Jacob Burns was awarded the Joe Marston Medal for the A-League grand final's best player after it was mistakenly awarded to Brisbane Roar playmaker Thomas Broich.

Following the Roar's controversial 2-1 win over the Glory on Sunday, Broich raised eyebrows when he was read out as the best on ground recipient in front of a packed Suncorp Stadium.

Broich did set up Besart Berisha's 84th-minute goal that locked up the scores at 1-1 before the Roar scored in stoppage time off a controversial foul to ensure they became the first team to win back-to-back a-League titles.

However he seemed fortunate to earn best-on-ground honours ahead of the workaholic Burns.

About an hour later, a red-faced A-League boss Lyall Gorman admitted an "administrative error" had led to Broich and not Burns being handed the medal.

"It was just a breakdown in communicatioon between the judging panel and the announcer - it was one of those unfortunate incidents," Gorman said,

"Just purely in the delivery from the votes being counted to (post-match announcer) Simon (Hill)."

Instead of receiving the medal in front of the grand final crowd, Burns was forced to accept the honour at the post-match press conference in the bowels of Suncorp Stadium.

"Unfortunately there has been an adminstrative error with the awarding of the J Marston Medal," Gorman said.

"We apologise to the Roar, Thomas Broich and Perth Glory, but most of all to Jacob Burns.

"It's just a shame it isn't done in front of 20,000 - at least we tried to rectify it."

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