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Mar 14, 2012

Clubs' World Cup

Norman Hubbard is ESPNsoccernet's resident anorak. If you have any questions on football facts, statistics or trivia, please send them to asknorman@hotmail.com and he'll try to answer as many as possible. Which club team has supplied the most World Cup winners? Paul Michelin from Sydney asked First, to say how I have answered this: I am counting everyone who was in the squad, whether or not they appeared in the final - they all receive a medal now and have been retrospectively awarded to squad players who were not recognised at the time - and only counting the club they were at when the World Cup took place. So, for instance, David Villa qualifies for Valencia in 2010, not Barcelona, whom he did not join until after the tournament. Also players who won multiple World Cups count for each triumph - so Pele adds three to Santos' score. Anyhow, there is a clear winner. If we rank clubs by World Cup winners then Juventus are the greatest on the planet. They have provided 24 campioni del mondo in five different tournaments. Some 22 are Italian, with the exceptions being the Frenchmen Zinedine Zidane and Didier Deschamps, who triumphed in 1998. As that indicates, a strong Juventus contingent tends to be a factor when Italy win the World Cup: only in 1938 have they triumphed with less than five bianconeri players. The nine Juve World Cup winners of 1934 is the joint biggest contingent from any club, with Penarol providing nine of the successful Uruguayan squad of 1950. The full table has a pleasing look for Serie A, with Italian clubs in the top two places and three of the top four. It is largely because Italy's four World Cups are bettered only by Brazil (five) but also reflects Serie A's pulling power over the last three decades; indeed, the Spain side of 2010 were the first World Cup winners since Argentina in 1978 not to have a player based in Italy. Indeed, imports contribute significantly to Inter's total of 20. They only supplied one of Marcello Lippi's triumphant team of 2006 - even if Marco Materazzi had a considerable impact on their eventual success - but had the third highest number of players in the West German side who won on Italian soil in 1990. They included the captain, Lothar Matthaus, and the man who scored the final's only goal, Andreas Brehme. There may be some surprise that Roma, a club with just three Scudetti to their name, have provided the joint third highest number of World Cup winners, but they had at least one in every tournament from 1990 to 2006, an indication they have signed high-calibre foreigners. Perhaps predictably, Bayern Munich are the leading non-Italian club: many a Germany side has been built around players based in Bavaria, including the victors of 1974 and 1990. The South American club with most reason to crow are Santos, whose 15 World Cup winners are all from the squads of 1958, 1962 and 1970, including Pele all three times. Botafogo, the second Brazilian club, also did not provide any of the winners in 1994 and 2002, a sign that the top Brazilian talent had moved on by then. As the high placings of Penarol and Nacional show, the majority of the Uruguay squads of 1930 and 1950 came from those two clubs. Penarol had provided the most World Cup winners from 1950 until 1970, when Santos overhauled them. Juventus went past the Brazilian club in 1982.

A few other things to note: the most successful English club are Liverpool, with three members of England's 1966 squad (Roger Hunt, Ian Callaghan and Gerry Byrne) and two Spaniards in 2010 (Pepe Reina and Fernando Torres); only three players have ever won the World Cup while playing their club football outside South America or Europe - the Brazilians Ronaldao and Leonardo, who were employed in Japan in 1994, and the Argentinian goalkeeper Hector Zeleda, who was at the Mexican club America in 1986; the first player to win the World Cup while playing for a foreign club was West Germany's Gunter Netzer, at Real Madrid in 1974; and one player has won the World Cup without having a club. He was the Argentine Alberto Tarantini, who had left Boca Juniors after a contractual dispute before the 1978 tournament, and who joined Birmingham City after it. The full list of winners per club in each World Cup is as follows: Uruguay 1930 - Nacional 8, Penarol 5, Bella Vista 3, Montevideo Wanderers 2, Olimpia 1, Rampla Juniors 1, Miramar Misones 1, Racing Club 1. Italy 1934 - Juventus 9, Inter 4, Roma 3, Bologna 2, Milan 1, Napoli 1, Lazio 1, Fiorentina 1. Italy 1938 - Inter 5, Roma 4, Bologna 3, Triestina 3, Juventus 2, Genoa 2, Pisa 1, Lucchese 1, Lazio 1. Uruguay 1950 - Penarol 9, Nacional 5, Cerro 3, Central 2, Danubio 2, Rampla Juniors 1. West Germany 1954 - Kaiserslautern 5, Hamburg 2, SpVgg Furth 2, Koln 2, Bayern Munich 1, Fortuna Dusseldorf 1, Hessen Kassel 1, Rot-Weiss Essen 1, Nuremberg 1, Schalke 1, FSV Frankfurt 1, Eintracht Frankfurt 1, Augsberg 1, Borussia Dortmund 1, Pirmasens 1. Brazil 1958 - Flamengo 4, Botafogo 3, Sao Paulo 3, Santos 3, Vasco da Gama 3, Corinthians 2, Fluminese 1, Portuguesa 1, Bangu 1, Palmeiras 1. Brazil 1962 - Santos 7, Botafogo 5, Fluminese 3, Palmeiras 3, Sao Paulo 2, Bangu 1, Portuguesa 1. England 1966 - Liverpool 3, Manchester United 3, West Ham 3, Blackpool 2, Leeds 2, Arsenal 1, Chelsea 1, Everton 1, Fulham 1, Leicester 1, Sheffield Wednesday 1, Southampton 1, Tottenham 1, Wolves 1. Brazil 1970 - Santos 5, Botafogo 3, Cruzeiro 3, Corinthians 2, Fluminese 2, Palmeiras 2, Atletico Mineiro 2, Flamengo 1, Gremio 1, Portuguesa 1. West Germany 1974 - Bayern Munich 7, Borussia Monchengladbach 5, Koln 3, Eintracht Frankfurt 2, Schalke 2, Fortuna Dusseldorf 1, Real Madrid 1, Werder Bremen 1. Argentina 1978 - River Plate 5, Independiente 4, Huracan 3, Talleres de Cordoba 3, San Lorenzo 2, Racing Club 2, Newell's Old Boys 1, Valencia 1, Unattached 1. Italy 1982 - Juventus 6, Inter 5, Fiorentina 5, Milan 2, Cagliari 1, Roma 1, Torino 1, Udinese 1. Argentina 1986 - Independiente 3, River Plate 3, Boca Juniors 2, Argentinos Juniors 2, Newell's Old Boys 1, Atletico Nacional 1, Estudiantes 1, Ferrel Carril Oeste 1, Fiorentina 1, Napoli 1, Nantes 1, Real Madrid 1, Lecce 1, Elche 1, America 1, Velez Sarsfield 1. West Germany 1990 - Bayern Munich 6, Koln 4, Inter 3, Borussia Dortmund 2, Werder Bremen 2, Roma 2, Eintracht Frankfurt 1, Nuremberg 1, Stuttgart 1. Brazil 1994 - Sao Paolo 3, Deportivo la Coruna 2, Palmeiras 2, Barcelona 1, Bayer Leverkusen 1, Bayern Munich 1, Bordeaux 1, Corinthians 1, Cruzeiro 1, Flamengo 1, Fluminese 1, Kashima Antlers 1, Paris Saint Germain 1, Reggiana 1, Roma 1, Shimuzu S-Pulse 1, Stuttgart 1, Vasco da Gama 1. France 1998 - Auxerre 3, Monaco 3, Arsenal 2, Juventus 2, Marseille 2, Bayern Munich 1, Chelsea 1, Inter 1, Metz 1, Milan 1, Paris Saint Germain 1, Parma 1, Real Madrid 1, Roma 1, Sampdoria 1. Brazil 2002 - Corinthians 3, Sao Paolo 3, Gremio 2, Atletico Mineiro 1, Atletico Paranaese 1, Barcelona 1, Bayer Leverkusen 1, Cruzeiro 1, Flamengo 1, Lyon 1, Inter 1, Milan 1, Palmeiras 1, Paris Saint Germain 1, Parma 1, Real Betis 1, Real Madrid 1, Roma 1. Italy 2006 - Juventus 5, Milan 5, Palermo 4, Roma 3, Lazio 2, Fiorentina 1, Inter 1, Lazio 1, Livorno 1, Udinese 1. Spain 2010 - Barcelona 8, Real Madrid 5, Valencia 3, Athletic Bilbao 2, Liverpool 2, Arsenal 1, Sevilla 1, Villarreal 1.

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