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Jamie Carragher walks out with Liverpool fans over ticket prices

ESPN FC's Craig Burley is fuming following a hike in ticket prices that saw Liverpool fans walk out against Sunderland.

Jamie Carragher joined Liverpool supporters' walk-out against Sunderland because clubs are "not looking after those closest to them."

Carragher was among those who left Anfield in the 77th minute on Sunday in protest at ticket prices, with fans angered by a £77 match ticket which is to be introduced next season.

He wrote in his Daily Mail column that Liverpool "have got this wrong" and suggested it would do wonders for the Premier League if teams froze the price of all tickets.

Instead, he said, the vast sums earned by the clubs in television revenue meant their approach to ticket pricing was like winning the lottery and not giving anything to one's parents.

"If you hit the jackpot on the lottery this week, what is the first thing you would do?" Carragher wrote. "I'd say you would go straight to your mum and dad and make sure they were looked after.

"That is the only comparison I can draw in this debate over Premier League ticket prices. The new television deal, which will see £5 billion pumped in domestically and another £3bn from overseas, means 20 clubs have won the lottery.

"So why are they not taking this chance to look after the fans?"

Liverpool fans walk out in the 77th minute against Sunderland.

The 38-year-old, who retired in 2013 after a 17-year career spent entirely at Liverpool, said that £77 was too much to pay anywhere, but "particularly over the top in Liverpool." And he questioned what the club's owners Fenway Sports Group (FSG) stood to gain in the long term.

"Is the negative PR from all this worth it? No, especially when you think -- to put things into perspective -- the club are still paying a large portion of Mario Balotelli's wages even though he's now at AC Milan.

"Liverpool generate around £35m from ticket income. Had FSG announced a freeze on prices when the new stand was completed, the income would have risen to £37m. The increase means they could generate £39m. All this for the sake of £2m for the ninth richest club in the world.

"But £2m back in the pockets of fans? That would be huge. The club say that £77 gets you the best seat in the newest stand in the country but why should that be an elitist thing? Why can't the normal working man have the chance to sit there? It isn't fair."

Meanwhile, former Liverpool manager Roy Evans believes the club will listen to the supporters over ticket prices.

"The walkout was done in a very positive way without any hassle whatsoever," Evans, who managed the club between 1994 and 1998, told talkSPORT. "I hope the club's response is as good as I thought the fans' protest was. I'm sure Liverpool are sensible enough to make this not a big issue and to listen to the fans.

"It's supposed to be a game for the fans. Whether you can afford tickets or you can't afford tickets, it's a game for everybody.

"I understand there's got to be revenue, there has got to be stuff going in. The players are getting paid ridiculous amounts of money -- we'd all take it by the way, don't get me wrong.

"But at the end of it all you can't just keep putting that load onto the fans."

Tom is ESPN FC's Liverpool correspondent. Follow him @writertombell.

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