UEFA Champions League
Previous
Aktobe Lento
Dinamo Tbilisi
3:00 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 1 - 0
Game Details
FK Ventspils
Malmo FF
4:00 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 0 - 0
Game Details
HJK Helsinki
Rabotnicki Kometal
4:00 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 0 - 0
Game Details
Steaua Bucuresti
Stromsgodset
5:30 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 1 - 0
Game Details
NK Maribor
Zrinjski Mostar
6:00 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 0 - 0
Game Details
St Patricks
Legia Warsaw
6:45 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 1 - 1
Game Details
FC Aarau
FC Sion Sitten
5:45 PM GMT
Game Details
FC Zürich
FC Thun
5:45 PM GMT
Game Details
San Jose
Chicago
2:30 AM GMT
Game Details
San Antonio Scorpions
Carolina RailHawks
12:30 AM GMT
Game Details
San Lorenzo
Bolívar
10:45 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Arsenal de Sarandí
Instituto de Córdoba
9:30 PM GMT
Game Details
Godoy Cruz de Mendoza
Defensa y Justicia
12:30 AM GMT
Game Details
Ceará
Chapecoense AF
10:30 PM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 2 - 1
Game Details
Avaí
Palmeiras
10:30 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
ABC
Novo Hamburgo
10:30 PM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Santa Cruz FC
Botafogo da Paraiba
1:00 AM GMT
Leg 2. Aggregate: 1 - 1
Game Details
AA Ponte Preta
CR Vasco da Gama
1:00 AM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Corinthians
Bahia
1:00 AM GMT
Leg 1
Game Details
Alianza Lima
Sport Huancayo
1:00 AM GMT
Game Details
U. Católica
Mushuc Runa
Postp
Game Details
Emelec
Deportivo Quito
Postp
Game Details
Independiente del Valle
Club Deportivo Cuenca
Postp
Game Details
Olmedo
El Nacional
Postp
Game Details
Liga de Loja
LDU Quito
Postp
Game Details
Manta F.C.
Barcelona
Postp
Game Details
Albirex Niigata
FC Tokyo
0
1
FT
Game Details
Gamba Osaka
Shimizu S-Pulse
4
0
FT
Game Details
Kashima Antlers
Omiya Ardija
2
2
FT
Game Details
Sagan Tosu
Kawasaki Frontale
0
1
FT
Game Details
Sanfrecce Hiroshima
Kashiwa Reysol
5
2
FT
Game Details
Tokushima Vortis
Urawa Red Diamonds
0
2
FT
Game Details
Vantforet Kofu
Cerezo Osaka
0
0
FT
Game Details
Vegalta Sendai
Nagoya Grampus Eight
3
3
FT
Game Details
Yokohama F. Marinos
Vissel Kobe
1
1
FT
Game Details
Washington Spirit
Portland Thorns FC
11:00 PM GMT
Game Details
Next

Marcotti: A tournament to remember

World Cup Jul 14, 2014
Read
 Posted by Iain Macintosh
Jun 19, 2014

For England, there's just no defence

The ESPN team in Brazil discuss the good and the bad from England's defeat to Uruguay.

So that's Luis Suarez when he's 50 percent fit, is it? That's Luis Suarez when he's "fit, but not match-fit," yeah? Well, I have a question: What is he going to do to this World Cup when he is match-fit?

There is a tendency for the English to react to defeat by building an enormous bonfire and then hurling one of their players on top of it. Manchester United are usually kind enough to donate a candidate. This year, that seems a little unnecessary. You could blame Wayne Rooney, but given that he offered up an entirely acceptable performance -- scored once, hit the post once, narrowly missed with an excellent free kick once and had a point-blank shot superbly saved once -- it would be a little mean.

UruguayUruguay
EnglandEngland
2
1
ESPN, ESPN3 FT
Match 23
Game Details

It would be even meaner to blame Steven Gerrard. Yes, he unwittingly provided the assist for Uruguay's winner, much as he did for Chelsea's winner in May and indeed France's winner in 2004. But no international team should be beaten by a long punt over the top in the 85th minute. And certainly not by a man who was in a wheelchair, an actual wheelchair, a month ago.

So what exactly will Luis Suarez look like when he's 100 percent fit?

This is where England are in 2014. They are a decent enough side, but they have few first-class players, and none at all in the defence. Ten years ago, they had Sol Campbell, John Terry and, when their knees were bending in the right direction, Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King. What they wouldn't give for just one of those men now. Ultimately, when a team defends as badly as England did against players of Suarez's class, they will lose football matches.

Beyond the lack of a generation equivalent to -- if not gold -- some other kind of precious metal, England's issues are much the same as they were in 2010. The stockpiling of young talent by big clubs hampers the progress of footballers in their early 20s. A relative lack of qualified coaches hampers the progress of footballers in their teens. Reduced access to suitable playing surfaces hampers the progress of children.

In four years, little has changed. England has one of the best top-flight leagues in the world, but greed, complacency and reckless government policy are surely far more destructive to her international hopes than Rooney and Gerrard.

It's been the defence of Roy Hodgson, left, that's come up particularly short. What England wouldn't do for a John Terry or Ledley King right about now.

But, hey, it's not over yet! England can still progress if Italy win both of their remaining games and the Three Lions beat Costa Rica, a scenario in which, admittedly, only the first two components seem plausible. And if that was to happen, stick with me on this, they would almost certainly face Colombia in the next round. And they'd probably lose.

Jose Pekerman's side are fast becoming one of the most interesting in the tournament. They've countered the loss of one of the world's best strikers, the stricken Radamel Falcao, by bringing all of their attacking midfielders to Brazil. They're everywhere. They're like tribbles. Every time you open a cupboard in the Colombia team hotel, two attacking midfielders fall out, while a third clings to a box of teabags and whinnies forlornly.

Their first game, an emphatic 3-0 victory over Greece, saw a coruscating display from Juan Cuadrado and some typically inventive genius from James Rodriguez. Thursday saw the introduction of Juan Quintero, a playmaker so bold that within minutes of his World Cup debut he was trying to lob Ivory Coast goalkeeper Boubacar Barry from 50 yards.

So, there's the answer, brokenhearted England fans. Dispense with ambition, leave your national pride at the door, relish in the fact that this is an international festival of football and maybe pretend that your grandfather was Colombian. It's easier this way.

- Jolly: Defensive shambles hurt England
- ESPN FC TV: Is Suarez the best in the world?
- 50-50 Challenge: Switzerland vs. France

In the day's third game, Japan and Greece did their best to ruin the World Cup for everyone by dragging out 90 minutes of toothless, counterattacking football with absolutely no end product. Greece captain Kostas Katsouranis boldly attempted to free up some space in the middle by getting himself sent off before halftime, but his selfless gesture went unrewarded.

Japan seemed determined to put as many dents in the advertising hoarding behind the Greek goal as they could, while at the same time distributing footballs to the children of Natal, Brazil, by hoofing them out of the stadium. A point suits neither team, but sympathy will be thin on the ground after a game like this. Japan and Greece can go and sit on the naughty step with Iran and Nigeria and they can jolly well think about what they've done.

At only 21, the sky's the limit for Paul Pogba.
France and Paul Pogba look like an interesting team to watch for the rest of the World Cup. Their next match is vs. their neighbour to the east, Switzerland.

Every English fan will be supporting Italy when they take on Costa Rica, but the day's most enticing fixture is between France and Switzerland. Didier Deschamps' side looked interesting last weekend, but it was hard to get a read on their level, given that Honduras were so keen to kick lumps out of them.

SwitzerlandSwitzerland
FranceFrance
2
5
ESPN, ESPN3 FT
Match 25
Game Details

This should be a far more fitting test. Honduras, for their part, will have fresh legs in Friday's final game. The legs in question belong to the Ecuadorean team, and they're unlikely to end the game in the same shape as they started.

Iain Macintosh

Iain Macintosh is a U.K. football correspondent for The New Paper in Singapore, writer for ESPN and co-author of "Football Manager Stole My Life" from @backpagepress. You can follow him on Twitter @iainmacintosh.

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.